Fuel Payment Testing - What Does It Take?

Fuel payment testing is frequently performed manually as actual hardware, and payment cards are required. Our approach to automating these tests using machine-based robotics, specialist payments components and advanced test automation earned us the “Most Innovative Project” award at the European Software Test Awards for 2020.

Let’s take a look at what it takes to automate fuel payments testing, starting with simulating the human interaction.

Most fuel retailers' test sets include pay at the kiosk and pay at pump scenarios. The components are shown in the following diagram.



Here are example scenarios:

Pay at Kiosk

This scenario included the following steps:

  • Select Pay at Kiosk on the Main Display

  • Tender a pre-pay amount using automation on the Kiosk Point of Sale and payment automation on the Kiosk Payment Terminal (with payment cards and PIN Entry robotics)

  • Select a fuel grade and nozzle

  • Begin fueling

  • Fuel to the tendered amount

  • End fueling

  • Return nozzle

  • Validate transaction values on the Sales Display, Grade Price, and Backend Systems

The scenario must be achieved with Chip, Swipe, and Contactless payments.

Pay at Pump

This scenario included the following steps:

  • Select Pay at Pump on the Main Display

  • Complete a successful payment transaction at the pump

  • Select a fuel grade and nozzle

  • Begin fueling

  • Fuel to the tendered amount

  • End fueling

  • Return nozzle

  • Validate transaction values on the Sales Display, Grade Price, and Backend Systems

The scenario must be achieved with Chip, Swipe, and Contactless payments, with multiple of each type of card.


Other scenarios included the customer use of loyalty cards and loyalty discounts, e.g., entering membership credentials via the keypad on the pump.

So how did we approach it? We broke the problem into elements and addressed each one. Let's take the interaction with the Main Display on the fuel pump. The Main Display provides the user with information and instruction and the keys around the display provide an input mechanism to perform actions such as selecting "Pay at Pump". We need to read, validate and synchronize on text displayed, and interact with the buttons. How would you do it? Talk to us to find out more.

0 comments